Fiji Relief Trip Day 9

Today Aisake and I drove over the mountain range that divides Vanua Levu Island. Savusavu where I’m staying is on the rainy side of the island and suffered worst from Typhoon Winston. Labasa where we drove to today is on the dry, northern side of the island in the rain shadow of the mountains. Although people in the Labasa area did suffer quite extensively from the storm, there are still some fruit trees standing, albeit without fruit, and some of their crops survived.

We made the two hour trip in order to visit the farm where Teach Us to Pray is now centering our bee project. All of our equipment for making hives was just delivered to the farm from Viti Levu Island where our project was previously located. Chuck hasn’t yet had time to set everything up, though he has completed a new shed to house bee box building activities. There’s enough room in the building to conduct training classes as well. There’s a huge demand right now for all the training we can provide.

I’d originally heard we didn’t lose any hives, though two had been blown off their stands during the high winds. As it turns out, one hive was destroyed. However the rest of our bees are doing fine. Chuck recently harvested honey. There was a group of university students from the States doing a project in the area. Chuck and his wife hosted these students during part of their stay. The kids left a couple of days ago and they bought all of the honey except for the one bottle Chuck saved for me. Really tasty honey, too.

We made plans for our next outreach tentatively scheduled for the first two weeks of December. By then Chuck should do another honey extraction and our hives should be ready to split. Our goal is to build our number of hives to 50. When we reach that number in three or four years, we should be able to begin to provide hives to those we train. We especially want to give hives to pastors and to churches as a source of income for ministry. Many pastors in Fiji have extremely minimal salaries and must earn income from other sources.

I also arranged for Chuck to come to Aisake’s place soon and build two mud ovens for Aisake’s wife, Lisa. Lisa just started baking bread which she will sell in nearby villages. Chuck’s wife will teach her to make wood-fired pizzas. Lisa can sell these at a fairly good profit, providing further income for their family. We are also doubling the size of Aisake’s chicken shed, which we built during our last outreach. Currently he has 16 laying hens and 25 meat birds. He sells eggs to neighbors and can’t keep up with the demand. These activities provide their only source of income at present. Like so many, they also lost all their crops during the Typhoon.

Just a few weeks before I arrived on this visit, Aisake and his family took in one of the orphan girls who attended our last camp. She’s turning 18 and can no longer stay at the home where she was raised. She had nowhere else to go.

Tomorrow we once more make our way across the island to visit the church where we held our last medical outreach in 2015. We’ll have lunch with the pastor and discuss our plans for December.

I Skyped with my wife Judy late this evening. Please be in prayer for her. She is experiencing nausea again. We don’t want a return of the illness that sent her to the hospital two weeks ago. She had been getting better, so this is a setback. I won’t be home until next Wednesday.

Thanks and Blessings!

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